Caves of the Margaret River Region

The region from Busselton to Augusta is one of Australia's most cave-rich areas with unique formations accessible to young and old. The entryways into these caves are as amazing as what is inside. Descend and explore them for yourself... 6 of over 100 are open to the public for viewing.

The caves in the Margaret River region are awesome!

Caves of the Region:

Calgardup Cave

Calgardup Cave
Calgardup Cave is one of the 2 self-guided caves managed by the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC). Basic equipment is Included in your entry fee plus information from the friendly Parks Office staff. Leisurely explore via a walkway with hand rails and view the exquisite cave decorations naturally by torchlight. 15 minutes south of Margaret River. Visit Calgardup Cave

Jewel Cave

Jewel Cave
Jewel Cave is spectacular. Visit Jewel Cave

Lake Cave

Lake Cave
Descend 350 steps beneath the ground to discover the exquisitely beautiful Lake Cave so named because of its permanent lake within. Be guided through the silent idyllically lit cave as you learn about its past, present and future. CaveWorks Eco Centre and Lake Cave Tearooms onsite. 20 minutes south of Margaret River Town. Visit Lake Cave

Mammoth Cave

Mammoth Cave
Aptly named Mammoth Cave brings you back in time offering a glimpse of the world in prehistoric times. Explore the caves up close and at your leisure with a self guided audio commentary which is excellent. Perfect for children. Educational. Stimulating. Wondrous and awe inspiring. 15 minutes south of Margaret River Town. Visit Mammoth Cave

Moondyne Cave

Moondyne Cave
Moondyne is the latest cave to open for viewing. Small groups 10 max are led by torchlight through the crystal chambers of Moondyne Cave to witness firsthand the unforgettable formations. Get fully kitted up for spelunking with overalls helmet headlamp waist bag water bottle and gloves and gain a full briefing. Moondyne is a large karst cave. Be awed by its splendour. 8kms north of Augusta. Visit Moondyne Cave

Ngilgi Cave

Ngilgi Cave
Ngilgi Cave is an amazing Karst cave system with the most beautiful array of varied crystal formations including shawls and helictites. The semi-guided tour gives you basic knowledge and cave history from the expert and friendly Guide plus personal exploration time. A great choice of range of exploratory tours are available to get you up close and personal with Ngilgi. 5 minute drive from Yallingup. Visit Ngilgi Cave

What are caves?

Caves form naturally by the weathering of rock and often extend deep underground. The word "cave" can also refer to much smaller openings such as sea caves, rock shelters, and grottos. Speleology is the science of exploration and study of all aspects of caves and the environment that surrounds the caves. Exploring a cave for recreation or science may be called caving, potholing, or spelunking.

Solutional caves are the most frequently occurring caves and such caves form in rock that is soluble, such as limestone. Rock is dissolved by natural acid in groundwater that seeps through bedding-planes, faults, joints and so on. Over geological epochs cracks expand to become caves and cave systems.

The largest and most abundant solutional caves are located in limestone. Limestone dissolves under the action of rainwater and groundwater charged with H2CO3 (carbonic acid) and naturally occurring organic acids. The dissolution process produces a distinctive landform known as karst, characterized by sinkholes, and underground drainage. Limestone caves are often adorned with calcium carbonate formations produced through slow precipitation. These include flowstones, stalactites, stalagmites, helictites, soda straws and columns. These secondary mineral deposits in caves are called speleothems.

Caves are found throughout the world, but only a small portion of them have been explored and documented by cavers. Caves are visited by many surface-living animals, including humans. These are usually relatively short-lived incursions, due to the lack of light and sustenance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cav

Natural rock formations

"When water flows down through the ground and into a cave, it dissolves a mineral called calcite (a major building block of limestone) and carries it through cracks in the ceiling. The dripping water leaves behind traces of calcite, which slowly builds up on the ceiling until a stalactite takes shape, hanging down like an icicle.

Water from the end of the stalactite leaves more calcite in a pile on the cave floor, and pretty soon a cone-like stalagmite forms. That’s why stalactites and stalagmites are usually found in pairs. Sometimes they grow together to form a pillar or column."
http://www.kidsdiscover.com/quick-reads/how-stalactites-and-stalagmites-form/


Caves of the Margaret River Region Photo Gallery

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Lake Cave


Margaret River Regional Caves Map

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Map to Caves of the Margaret River Region:

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